Designing a future economy is the Design Council’s 2017 report investigating the skills used in design, the link between these skills and productivity and innovation, and how they align with future demand for skills across the wider UK economy.

This interactive data visualisation situates these findings within the wider context of the technological and economic change taking place as part of the fourth industrial revolution, highlighting how design has an important role to play in the UK’s future. However it also highlights that without urgent action, the supply of these design skills is at risk.

Launch our interactive guide to design skills.

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Use our interactive data visualisation.

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News & opinion

How do we define design skills? As debate rages on as to how the UK best capitalises on the technological changes being brought by the fourth industrial revolution, Design Council has been leading the conversation about the key role design skills can play. But what do we mean by design skills? Design Council has been leading the conversation about the key role design skills can play. But what do we mean by design skills?

Feature — 06/12/2017

WATCH: Design Council on London LIVE Design Council CEO Sarah Weir OBE and our Director of Policy and Communications, Sally Benton, appeared on London LIVE to discuss the findings of our Designing a future economy research and its implications for London and the South East. CEO Sarah Weir OBE and Director of Policy and Communications Sally Benton discuss the findings of our Designing a Future Economy research.

News — 11/12/2017

A brief history of the measurement of design How do you measure the value of design and designers? Ahead of the launch of our latest research exploring the value of design skills, Stephen Miller reviews how the measurement of design has evolved over recent years. Ahead of the launch of our latest research exploring the value of design skills, we look at how the measurement of design has evolved.

Feature — 30/11/2017

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